Showing posts with label selfpromo. Show all posts
Showing posts with label selfpromo. Show all posts

Monday, April 6, 2015

Why Your Next Postcard Design Could Come From Etsy

What makes postcard designer ZeusVintage noteworthy is the web platform they use: Etsy.

The Doncaster, England designer creates custom postcard layouts for hire, or "bespoke postcard design" as they say.   And if their web examples reflect the typical fair, then we'd say 'thumbs up'.

The Etsy platform is traditionally used by artisans and craftsmen, but not so much by print designers. 

The selection of Etsy reflects a trend where print designers are looking for new ways to promote themselves digitally, and web platforms like Etsy are happy to accommodate them.

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ZeusVintage offers postcard design via Etsy:




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Recently, Amazon has started promoting local businesses and now offers plumbers and electricians.   For Amazon, print designers and graphic artists are not far behind.
 
As designers 'break out' of the traditional web platforms, one wonders if this is an experiment that will stick.   The months ahead should prove interesting, as ecommerce continues to re-invent itself.
 
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Friday, October 4, 2013

Kudos: Dlouhy Branding and Design

Often times, designers need to be brave.  It takes courage to whittle down a complex description into an effective brand message.

Too many designs are based on a "kitchen sink" strategy, where the layout includes multiple messages and the corresponding details for each.

These unfortunate, busy designs are often a result of "design by committee."  Or they're designs with purely the results in mind -- forgetting that there is a reader involved.

A great design starts with the reader, introduces an idea and leads to results.

These designs often appear simple.  But it's in the designer's whittling that much of the work is done.

Check out this week's example by the designers at Dlouhy Branding + Design.

These two postcards, used as a self-promotion, are tasked with grabbing attention (with color and boldness), asking a question ("does your brand need a facelift?") and offering a solution ("Dlouhy").

The first postcard sets the stage.  The follow-up postcard reinforces the message.

Our mind searches out simplicity and filters out complexity.  The best postcard design will avoid the filter.

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Do you have examples of a great postcard design?  We'd like to see them!  Simply use the Comments feature of this blog and let us know a little about your project -- we'll respond with how to send your images to us. Thank you!

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Card 1: "ignite."
Dlouhy Branding + Design


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Card 2: "refresh."
Dlouhy Branding + Design